Joel Fry's Fundraising Page


Steven Edward Fry was born November 2nd, 1945 in Harlingen, Texas.  He earned his ungraduate degree at the University of Texas in Austin where he met his wife, Jan Hastedt Fry.  Steve was fortunate to attend U.T. while the football program was at a peak under the steward of Darrell K. Royal.  He went on to earn a graduate law degree which served him well throughout his entire career.  Most importantly, Steve continues to be a great father to his three sons, Steven, Casey and me.

I'm also a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, where I earned a B.B.A. in Finance from the McCombs School of Business.  My brothers, Steven and Casey are both Longhorn graduates and we recognize all that the University has done for us.     

I joined the Legacy Council for the Darrell K. Royal Research Fund for Alzheimer's Disease in 2016 for my father, Steve Fry, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in early 2013.  Behind my father and Coach Royal, two men who have served as role models for so many, I hope to raise awareness for this disease.

Throughout the process of learning about Dad's diagnosis, I was truly astounded at how little people know about Alzheimer's.  As I think about raising awareness for the disease, I cannot help but be inspired through the most salient life lesson my father taught me growing up.  That is, dogged perseverance usually prevails.  As we all know, Coach Royal also lived his life with a true grit mindset. As such, I believe the DKR Foundation is the perfect platform for me to express my thoughts on this tragic disease with the hope that others of you will also see this as good way to raise persistent awareness.  

One reason the topic of Alzheimer's disease is very hard to discuss is that its direct victims are challenged to lead a campaign.  My view is that there are so many indirect victims who should feel obligated to speak on direct victim's behalf.  Further, I'd like to recognize that the burden for any primary caregiver - in Dad's case, my mother - is heavy, perhaps worse in some circumstances than the person who is sick.  I'd encourage others to recognize these unique challenges and feel obligated to speak out on behalf of those who are suffering most.  My goal is that my children's children look back on this disease in disbelief; the notion of prematurely losing one's memory should seem unthinkable. Without memory, what else do we have?            

I'm grateful for Coach Royal, Dad and the University for providing a platform for me to express my feelings about Alzheimer's Disease; and, in doing so, begin the long road towards raising awareness.